Goodreads Monday- What Lies Between Us

25663781What Lies Between Us
by Naomi Munaweera
320 pages
published February 2016

From Goodreads: From the award-winning author of Island of a Thousand Mirrors comes the confession of a woman, driven by the demons of her past to commit a single and possibly unforgivable crime.

“The walls of my cell are painted an industrial white, like albumen. They must think the color is soothing. Where I come from it connotes absence, death, unrelenting loneliness.”

In the idyllic hill country of Sri Lanka, a young girl grows up with her loving family; but even in the midst of this paradise, terror lurks in the shadows. When tragedy strikes, she and her mother must seek safety by immigrating to America. There the girl must reinvent herself as an American teenager to survive, with the help of her cousin. Both love and loss fill her life, but even as she assimilates and thrives, the secrets and scars of her past follow her into adulthood. In this new country of freedom, everything she has built begins to crumble around her, and her hold on reality becomes more and more tenuous. When the past and the present collide, she sees no other choice than to commit her unforgivable final act. This is her confession.


This is another book I found on my public library’s Pinterest feed that I added to my TBR because I want to read more books from around the world. Given its subject matter, I don’t know if it’s something I’ll read soon. Maybe in the autumn, when it’s not so hot and I feel like tackling stories with heavy subject matter.

Goodreads Monday- Behold the Dreamers

Goodreads Monday is a weekly meme where we randomly choose a book from our Goodreads To Read list and share it with everyone. A lot of people do this. I got the idea from Danielle over at Books, Vertigo and Tea


dreamersBehold the Dreamers
by Imbolo Mbue
380 pages.

From Goodreads: Jende Jonga, a Cameroonian immigrant living in Harlem, has come to the United States to provide a better life for himself, his wife, Neni, and their six-year-old son. In the fall of 2007, Jende can hardly believe his luck when he lands a job as a chauffeur for Clark Edwards, a senior executive at Lehman Brothers. Clark demands punctuality, discretion, and loyalty—and Jende is eager to please. Clark’s wife, Cindy, even offers Neni temporary work at the Edwardses’ summer home in the Hamptons. With these opportunities, Jende and Neni can at last gain a foothold in America and imagine a brighter future.

However, the world of great power and privilege conceals troubling secrets, and soon Jende and Neni notice cracks in their employers’ façades.

When the financial world is rocked by the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the Jongas are desperate to keep Jende’s job—even as their marriage threatens to fall apart. As all four lives are dramatically upended, Jende and Neni are forced to make an impossible choice.

I came across this book while looking through my local library’s ‘New Fiction’ Pinterest board. Because I’m trying to read more books by authors from around the world, and because it has been so well reviewed, I decided to add it to my list.

Goodreads Monday: The Ghosts of Evolution

Welcome back to Goodreads Monday, where I tell you about a book on my TBR that I plan to read…. someday.

This week’s randomly selected book is:

41LmijbcUTL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_The Ghosts of Evolution
by Connie Barlow
Non-Fiction
304 pages

From Goodreads: A new vision is sweeping through ecological science: The dense web of dependencies that makes up an ecosystem has gained an added dimension-the dimension of time. Every field, forest, and park is full of living organisms adapted for relationships with creatures that are now extinct. In a vivid narrative, Connie Barlow shows how the idea of “missing partners” in nature evolved from isolated, curious examples into an idea that is transforming how ecologists understand the entire flora and fauna of the Americas. This fascinating book will enrich the experience of any amateur naturalist, as well as teach us that the ripples of biodiversity loss around us are just the leading edge of what may well become perilous cascades of extinction.

A friend recommended this to me, saying that it was weird and fascinating. As we have similar tastes in science writing, it sounded like something I would enjoy.

What’s on your TBR?